Classical Music online - News, events, bios, music & videos on the web.

Classical music and opera by Classissima

Antonín Dvorák

Friday, August 18, 2017


ArtsJournal: music

August 3

Top Posts From AJBlogs 08.02.17

ArtsJournal: musicWho’da Thunk? I don’t like spending money. I’m leery of signing up for ongoing contracts for service unless I really, really have to (want to). So when we bought a new “pre-owned” car that came with a three-month trial subscription to SiriusXM™ satellite radio I was not overwhelmed with joy. But here’s what happened. ... read more AJBlog: Engaging Matters Published 2017-08-01 Bard SummerScape’s latest operatic resurrection: Dvorak takes Boris Godunov many steps further Dmitrij is an opera that keeps growing before your very ears. And growing. And growing, until you have some of the most dramatically apt music Dvorak ever wrote for the stage. ... read more AJBlog: Condemned to Music Published 2017-08-01

Norman Lebrecht - Slipped disc

July 6

Was Dvorak the first great American composer?

It’s a proposition that Joe Horowitz examines in close detail with a couple of radio pals here. I’ve put it to one side for weekend listening, but there can be no doubt that America changed Dvorak – and for the better. Without his trip, there would have been no New World symphony and no cello concerto. How much of America he morphed into music is the subject of Joe’s examination.




My Classical Notes

June 26

Music for a Summer Night, with Renee Fleming

Summer Night Concert 2017 This recorded outdoor concert featured the following music: Dvorak: Carnival Overture, Op. 92 Za tihlou Gazelou (from Armida), with Renée Fleming (soprano) Mesícku na nebi hlubokém ‘Song to the Moon’ (from Rusalka), with Renée Fleming (soprano) Humperdinck: Hanse & Gretel Overture Rachmaninov: Twilight, Op.21 No. 3, with Renée Fleming (soprano) Ne poy, krasavitsa, pri mne, Op. 4 No. 4, with Renée Fleming (soprano) Spring torrents, Op. 14 No.11, with Renée Fleming (soprano) Stravinsky: The Firebird: Danse infernale du roi Kastchei Berceuse from The Firebird Finale from The Firebird Tchaikovsky: Sleeping Beauty, Op. 66 – Pas d’action Waltz from Sleeping Beauty, Op. 66 Williams, John: Hedwig’s Theme (from Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone) All performed by the Wiener Philharmoniker, Christoph Eschenbach conducting. Fairytales and myths have inspired composers from time immemorial, and audiences, too, have invariably been entertained by the unending struggle between good and evil. Central to the Vienna Philharmonic’s 2017 Summer Night Concert are German, French, Russian and Czech fairytales as well as a contemporary fantasy figure that is Anglo-Saxon in origin. In 2017 the Summer Night Concert will again be conducted by one of the most distinguished musicians of our time. Christoph Eschenbach, who also conducted the 2014 Summer Night Concert, is in demand as a guest conductor for prominent orchestras and opera houses worldwide. Since 2010 he has been musical director of the National Symphony Orchestra in Washington D.C. Having begun his career as a pianist, he learned conducting under George Szell and Herbert von Karajan. Since making his debut as a conductor in 1972, he has led renowned orchestras, including the Tonhalle-Orchester in Zurich, the Houston Symphony Orchestra, the Orchestre de Paris and the Philadelphia Orchestra.



My Classical Notes

June 23

Dvorak Cello Concerto by Marc Coppey

Dvorak’s Cello Concerto, and Shelomo by Ernst Bloch Bloch, E: Schelomo Dvorak: Cello Concerto in B minor, Op. 104 Waldesruhe (Silent woods) for cello and orchestra, Op. 68 No. 5 All performed by Mark Coppey (cello), with the Symphonie Orchester Berlin, Kirill Karabits conducting. In his work, “Schelomo”, composer Ernst Bloch examines his cultural and religious roots; in his cello concerto, Dvořák illustrates both his old and his new native countries, whilst the forest scene Klid represents a bridge and also an atmospheric reminiscence. Having spent nearly two decades playing solo recitals and chamber music, as well as performing alongside renowned orchestras, Marc Coppey turns to three classics of the cello repertoire: Bloch’s Schelomo was written immediately before his crossing to America; Dvořák composed his B minor Cello Concerto only once he had arrived there. Klid (Silent Woods) sits in between: before departing for America, Dvořák arranged this work, originally for piano duet, for cello and piano, to be played during his farewell tour. In this format, the piece became so popular that he went on to produce an additional version for cello and orchestra. Antonín Dvořák and Ernest Bloch provide clear performing instructions, but also demand a high degree of free interpretation. Marc Coppey manages to realize both of these aspects, maintaining a convincing balance and communicating intensively with the orchestra. Here is Marc Coppey, performing the Dvorak Concerto for Cello:

Norman Lebrecht - Slipped disc

June 22

Can we take the kids to a sold-out concert? (Yes, we can)

Anthea Kreston ‘s musical life in Berlin is one surprise after another… This past weekend I came home at 2 pm, exhausted from life in general, but more specifically from a morning of teaching at the University of the Arts, practising for this week’s work in the Berlin Philharmonic, and a (seemingly) narrowly-survived maiden voyage sleepover (at one point, all three girls were in tears – one was tired, one was hungry, and one was lonely – all sad despite my carefully planned egg-carton painting, popcorn making and pine-cone badminton). As I entered the house, eyes drooping, I saw my husband, cello in hand, dressed for his concert, and the girls in all sorts of finery – purses, wedding shoes and golden headbands, clearly planning on going to the Gendarmenmarkt for the Konzerthaus Orchestra concert. I desperately tried a combination of winking and wide eyed emphatic talking to “explain” that his concert was sold out, we couldn’t go, I had a student, I was starving, couldn’t stay standing for much longer, please please can we not go, etc. It fell to deaf ears, as the girls were set on it, and Jason had already gotten tickets. Considering my 5 minute turn-around, I was pleasantly surprised to find a cold, half-drunk cup of coffee from that morning (I hope), and I grabbed some other nearly-eatables (half-finished PBJ from the table, etc) and off we went. A fresh coat of deodorant and a new shirt was going to have to suffice. As we drove, Jason told the girls the entire story of the Miraculous Mandarin (Bartok’s incredible work, originally banned for its controversial content). It sounded just like one of his regular “stories from head” that he tells the girls. They have about 10 different serials that he makes up night after night – from Spacegirl Meerb and Alien Tzip to Super Sisters and even a period private eye series. The Miraculous Mandarin is filled with bad guys, a bad girl, dancing, robbers, a glowing huge guy, and a final show-down complete with a hidden choir singing wordlessly as the Mandarin floats in a cloud of green gasses. Just up our alley. As we walked up the red carpeted 29 steps to the magnificent Konzerthaus, I knew that this had been the right choice. The girls were wide-eyed at the chandeliers, the light-blue walls – the busts of composers lining the rectangular concert hall. The first half was Sibelius – “Valse Triste” and the violin concerto, performed by artist-in-residence Patricia Kopatchinskaja. After intermission, the Bartok. The girls loved it – they liked how shiny the flute was, how the violinist’s dress looked really old, and how her hair was all messy, and how sometimes she turned completely around in a circle. They loved trying to find the secret choir (only to be completely excited to realize they were in street clothes and hidden in the audience). They loved eating ice cream that had cookie dough in it, watching Dada play his cello, waving at him, clapping loudly, calling out “dada” instead of “bravo”, and eating middle-eastern food after. When the soloist passed our restaurant, the girls clapped, and she stopped to talk to the us. Then she hailed a cab – which was equally exciting. And the bathroom in the restaurant has soap that smelled so good, they each took 6 squirts. All of these details had equal weight for the girls, and altogether made for a great evening. My exhaustion just melted away as I saw the experience through their eyes – I am so happy that I lost the winking argument. This week I play again with Berlin – in a concert with no violins! What a concept. Brahms, Turnage, and Dvorak. Jason and the girls will come, and I am sure they will enjoy the Brahms as much as they enjoy choosing their cake and eating it with mom at intermission.

Antonín Dvorák
(1841 – 1904)

Antonín Leopold Dvo?ák (September 8, 1841 - May 1, 1904) was a Czech composer of Romantic music, who employed the idioms of the folk music of Moravia and his native Bohemia. Dvo?ák's works include operas, symphonic, choral and chamber music. His best-known works include his New World Symphony, the Slavonic Dances, "American" String Quartet, the opera Rusalka, and Cello Concerto in B minor.



[+] More news (Antonín Dvorák)
Oct 29
Joe's Concert Rev...
Oct 28
The Well-Tempered...
Oct 28
Google News AUSTR...
Oct 28
Google News UK
Oct 28
Google News USA
Oct 28
Google News CANADA
Oct 28
Google News IRELAND
Oct 27
My Classical Notes
Oct 27
Topix - Classical...
Oct 27
Meeting in Music
Oct 25
The Well-Tempered...
Oct 21
Topix - Classical...
Oct 13
Wordpress Sphere
Oct 12
The Boston Musica...
Oct 9
ArtsJournal: music
Oct 8
The Well-Tempered...
Oct 6
My Classical Notes
Oct 5
The Boston Musica...
Sep 25
Topix - Opera
Sep 23
Topix - Classical...

Antonín Dvorák




Dvorák on the web...



Antonín Dvorák »

Great composers of classical music

New World Symphony Rusalka Cello Concerto Water Goblin

Since January 2009, Classissima has simplified access to classical music and enlarged its audience.
With innovative sections, Classissima assists newbies and classical music lovers in their web experience.


Great conductors, Great performers, Great opera singers
 
Great composers of classical music
Bach
Beethoven
Brahms
Debussy
Dvorak
Handel
Mendelsohn
Mozart
Ravel
Schubert
Tchaikovsky
Verdi
Vivaldi
Wagner
[...]


Explore 10 centuries in classical music...